No tribe on earth knows the true meaning of nonconformity better than the Shuar. Living in the Amazon at the headwaters of the Marañón River, the Shuar are believed to be the only group to have never been conquered, and even after technology has connected the world beyond our wildest dreams, these people have held on to their traditions, including the custom of shruken heads (tsantsas). Many believe that these artifacts were kept as trophies, taken for honor and spiritual renewal—they were a badge of pride. Not everything fits neatly into the glorified history of our old textbooks, Deadhead Rum celebrates the history less studied. Shrunken heads symbolize this exotic and unusual past, along with individuality and courage.  They are a part of our cultural heritage and are a vivid reminder of the many varied practices, which give color and interest to our world. The bottle looks like it came off an ancient Caribbean pirate ship with hand-tied hemp lacings to sew the eyes and mouth shut. Subtly intricate in detail, it respects the heritage and belief systems of a region, that captures the spirit of the Shuar and tastes the way it looks: complex and beautiful (but maybe not in the most accepted manner). DeadHead Rum in no way condones the practice of human mutilation, however we cannot ignore the importance of such rituals to some tribal cultures: both recent and in ages past.  Head shrinking is part of the human experience and like all cultural practices, bears understanding.